Reporting is pretty simple gather facts that answer the age-old questions of Who? What? Where? When? Why? How? Then, present that information to the audience—and presto—you have journalism.  Kotecki, prior to joining Politico, answered all of those questions in his dorm room.

For example, when Kotecki interviewed Ron Paul in his dorm room about his political platform during the presidential nomination process in order to inform and create a dialogue with his audience. He did all of this using a video camera and sent his message via YouTube.

This does not seem much different from Chris Matthews sitting in a small staged area interviewing Mike Huckabee about his political platform during the presidential nomination process in order to inform his audience. All of this was recorded using a television camera and sent via the television.

One difference between network reporting and blog reporting is one is focused on revenue and the other is not—for the most part. Network reporting is focused on making a ROI when they cover an event or issue. Crouse (2003) states, “The networks came to Miami [political conventions] because it was good for business” (P. 155). Whereas bloggers would attend a convention to gather information in order to create a dialogue with their fans.

One similarity is network media and bloggers both want to increase viewership. They both do this by trying to present unique and timely information first.

How the world views information is changing. America has endured this change when the television became the medium of choice over radio, and now, we are experience a shift from television to the internet. Invariably, this change will shift the perception of what journalism is.